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IWISHIHAD
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On August 21, The Telegraph reported that a fisherman had caught an extremely rare bahaba off the coast of Fujian Province in China. The fish weighed 176 pounds, and at £1,700 a pound, the fisherman collected £300,000 for the fish, or over $475,000.

The bahaba fetches high market prices for its swim bladder, which is used in Chinese medicine to treat lung and heart ailments. The fish has been known to exceed 200 pounds, so despite the impressive size of the August 21 catch, there have been larger specimens out there that yielded even higher paydays, such as one caught in south China in 2010 that sold for $540,000.


As impressive a haul as that is, it didn't represent the highest known payday for something caught from the sea. There have been other fish worth hundreds of thousands of dollars more, and even though they represent the exception, they're out there nonetheless. The sea is home to fish that people don't mind paying a lot of money for, and that makes $7.99 for a pound of salmon look like chump change in comparison.

The $736,700 Mega-Fish


On January 5, a Japanese fishing industry still reeling from the March 2011 tsunami got a much-needed shot in the arm. On that day, a Bluefin tuna weighing almost 592 pounds was caught near the seaside Japanese town of Oma.

Normally, when a large fish is sold at Tokyo's Tsukiji central fish market, the purchase is split between a local bar and a Hong Kong restaurant chain. This time, the fish was purchased in its entirety by a Japanese company.

The tuna was purchased by the Kiyomura Company in Tokyo for a record-setting $736,700, or approximately $1,244 a pound. The company that made the massive purchase owns the Sushi Zanmai restaurant chain, and owner Kiyoshi Kimura told The Wall Street Journal that rather than split the cost with a foreign company, he wanted this to be a purely Japanese purchase.

"Rather than having it taken away overseas, I wish for Japanese people to eat good tuna together," he said. "Despite the March 11 earthquake and the sluggish economy, I want to lift up Japan's spirits, urging people to work hard together."

'Like Winning the Lotto'


While the $736,700 Bluefin was an exceptional find, such fish bring in an impressive haul only when they're handled in the right way.

On August 3, Irish fisherman Tom Kennedy caught a Bluefin off the coastal town of Dingle. It didn't quite measure up to the Oma catch, but it was pretty impressive nonetheless, weighing in at 308 pounds.

Unfortunately, he was unable to sell his catch in Japan and live off the proceeds. Japanese regulations require that any fish to be used in sushi must be frozen within 20 minutes of being caught, which Kennedy sadly failed to do.

Kevin Flannery, director of the Dingle Oceanworld aquarium, told The Irish Sun that Kennedy now stood to earn only "a few hundred Euro," and would have been singing a happier tune if he had been able to sell it in Japan. "It would be like winning the lotto," Flannery said. "Bluefin tuna is the most expensive commercially caught fish."

Flannery tried to put a happy face on the scenario, saying that Japan's loss was now Ireland's gain. Local fish and chips shops would have plenty of delicious Bluefin on hand to enjoy for the entire week.

Black Market Delicacy


As the discriminating gourmand is no doubt aware, the beluga sturgeon from the Caspian Sea is the source of beluga caviar, a luxury commodity that's synonymous with high-end elegance. The International Union for Conservation of Nature lists it as "critically endangered," the highest-risk category on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, and the caviar was banned in the United States by the Fish and Wildlife Service in 2005.

At the time of the ban, beluga caviar sold for $200 an ounce, and 60 percent of all worldwide consumption took place in the United States. The ban allowed some U.S. companies to take up the slack, such as the California Caviar Company, which sells caviar from locally-farmed sturgeon that retails for $80 an ounce.

Legal outlets sell caviar with tastes and textures very similar to the banned variety, but for some people, it just ain't the same. These people are willing to pay much higher prices for the real thing on the black market, and a 2010 report from the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development quoted caviar importer Armen Petrossian, who estimated that one ounce of beluga caviar from the Caspian Sea can fetch as much as $500.

A Fish to Die For


Fugu is the Japanese word for pufferfish. Eating it has the potential to be very costly, and not just in the traditional sense. The fugu's organs contain tetrodotoxin, a deadly poison that asphyxiates its victim if ingested. Common sense dictates that people would stay as far away from fugu as possible, but it's actually a delicacy for which some people pay handsomely.

To prepare the fish for safe consumption, Japanese chefs are required to undergo up to three years of apprenticeship, followed by a licensing exam and, finally, eating the fish that they themselves have prepared for the first time. If they don't succumb to paralysis, muscle shutdown and ultimately death, then they pass.

One might assume that the person who would order this meal is a very aggressive, type A personality, possibly one who is hoping to impress his girlfriend. Jameson Parvizad, general manager of the Blowfish To Die For restaurant in San Francisco, Calif. insists that this is not the case. "The kind of people who order it are people that are foodies, and are really down to try something that isn't offered anywhere else," he said in an interview.


Adventurous Americans wishing to try fugu stateside should be comforted by the fact that chefs have had to receive extensive training similar to that of Japanese fugu chefs in order to prepare the dish. Blowfish To Die For has a single, dedicated chef whose job it is to prepare the restaurant's special six-course meal for two. The price for an adventurous couple to dine with death is $280.

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glassman
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when i lived in souterhn virginia, i regularly fished out of hatteras (manteo)and giant bluefin are in the water there, and i had a federal commercial hook and line licesne so i could legally sell my catch. but they would not let me keep the gian bluefins even tho they bring a couple thousand easily. i understand they now issue a permit per year to individuals, but back then they only let the massachussetes guys keep 'em...

another example of Established Businesses USING the govt lobby to keep startups out of the game... i could catch four in a day by myself before i was just plain wore the frig out.

Bluefin brings alot more if you harpoon and then electrocute it immediately, but i was rod-reel and caught that way they still bring good money, but not ichiban tokyo sashimi grade like in your article iwish- i wasn't fishing to get rich but i did sell what i could to pay the gas bills which were only 300 per trip then, now it would be 700....
a littel secret about one of the best fish to eat? Wahoo is awesome, and i know its considered bad form but marlin is just about as good as wahoo. sometime you kill them bring 'em in so you have to eat 'em

i would get two dollars pound live wieght for mahi mahi and yellowfin or bigeye tuna, 3 dollars for wahoo

mahi mahi was only 2.50 on the best days (when others were short on them) i sold direcltly to the restaurants for their catch of the day...

restaurants didn't put marlin on the menu but i think they sometimes sold it as wahoo [Wink]
some restaurants asked me to bring 'em marlin for catering... i never did it

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glassman
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another thin that people walk by all the time and don't know what they are looking at is ambergris. It's a waxy gray to golden substance that can smell just like chit. It washes up on beaches, and depending on the quality can be 25$ per gram. it's used in perfumery [Wink]

here's 63,000$ worth:

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Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

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glassman
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shheeesh, i forgot to mention that ambergris is (in) whalechit [Big Grin]

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Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

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IWISHIHAD
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What i don't understand is why more boats aren't freezing those bluefins and selling them in Japan?

Plenty of boats have the capabilities to freeze.

Take those boats out of Alaska and fish Mexico can't be more dangerous than those seas in Alasksa in winter crabbing.

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raybond
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All sounds good, But I am a land lover always have been . I can get sea sick on a ship when it is docked. I guess I will search for my gold the old fashion way I will mine for it.

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glassman
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US Federal Law Iwish. This is a real good example of why the govt has too many regualtions and why we unfortunately need (most of) them. I prolly should have been a marine biologist instead of glass blower. I was catching tadpoles and raising them into frogs 'fore i i finished 3rd grade. Since my wife has been looking for a new job for the last three years (non-stop) i have seen more jobs for fisheries managemtn and study than any others.

bluefin tuna standard grade is worth 20 a pound fresh- it's illegal tho. If it were legal it would only be 5$ per pound. Fresh-flash frozena SHIPPED to Tokyo? it can go as much 75$ per pound last i looked. and i looked and looked and looked, and wasnot allowed itno the biz.

the massachussetttes fishery is locked up tight by a few playrs and it's like amafia that has a deal wuthteh Govt. Now you have to realise that a grander bluefin is not common, but 300 to 600 pounders were common last i was fishing hatteras.

I could not get the commercial bluefin permit cuz the fish are supposedly under alot of pressure. But i saw pictures of schools taken from airplane that showed ten thousand nad more on th surface with maybe 100 times thatjust below. They ahve been cautious witht htefishery, but soemthing else was going on. I belevie there has been presure from Japan to not supply too many, and i also am positive the Massachussetes boyz were lobbying that angle too. The scientists love haveing the funding to protect the fishery.

We have already destroyed (literally) several fisherys in the north atlantic and the proper way to take a sashimi grade tuna is very reminiscnet of whaling - with harpoon and elecctric shoock.... the reason is that the fish can burn it's fat off when you are fighting it, and the fat is what makes Ichiban Sashimi (ichibon = #1). As you fight the fish, lactic acids build up in the blood and muscle too which degrade teh qualtiy. The japanese take tiny core smples of the whole fish and grade it accrding to how fast you killed your fish. And how fatty and or oily it is. More fat? Higher grade. It's a serious market.

we would probably dstroy this fishery too if we don't regulate, but i couldn't get in. and i was all prepared to be able to flash freeze too. I looked real hard at gojng blackmarket, but the Coasties down there boarded me every 4th or fifht trip and it's hard to hide a 500 pound fish and the space it takes to flash freeze it on anything smaller than 50 foot, and even then, they'd know who i was and what i was fishing for. Inother words, it's not really possible to go balck markt on it without a really good covr story... it would have been easier to smugle dope than bluefins flash frozen... i could cut em up if iw as desperate, but then it's just anyold tuna to anybody not an expert. 4$ a pound for filets max.

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glassman
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there is also a thriving Koi business in this coutnry. It's hard work, requires you to live a peaceful sedate contemplative lifestyle and can bring you major bucks if you are good a it:

this fish at 18 inches long would easily bring 2500$ on the auction. maybe more if th right buyeers were theri, it's an outstanding example:

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i prefer the black and silver or platinum buttrfly koi myself, i had some in my pond, but hey outgrew it and i only raise frogs in it now... my next place will have a serous Koi pond.

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IWISHIHAD
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That's interesting on the bluefin side although not surprising.

It seems like there are many industries that being on the inside really helps.

If the oil is what they seek just eat mackeral the lower grade bluefin.

I walk our local piers from time to time which i use to fish a lot as a kid.

These fishermen/women keep everything today, many times leaving it on the pier deck quite a while before cleaning them, have no clue how they don't get sick.

We use to throw most small ones back and keep very few big ones, not any more, no wonder they have to make more restrictions all the time, what a shame.

People at times will be three feet apart if there catching these small mackeral, hardly having any elbow room, i just wish every so often they would catch a big mackeral or bonita like we caught when we were kids, if so they would have twenty lines tangled.

Just no courtesy anymore.

I still fish off the shore from time to time with grankids, hook the fish then give the pole to them to reel in, then throw the fish back.

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glassman
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the real draw to bluefin is eating the raw fish chunks (sashimi) sushi is a general term covering the typpe of food that sashimi is.
the grades are a sort of filtering effect like in caviar. there's the cheap stuff for genrela consumption then there the champagne and caviar for the ones the 'deserve" it.. th eamount of fat is critical to the sweetness.

if you are an sashimi eater? you have prolly tasted so-called white tuna here in the uSA.. it is ILLEGAL to serve it in japna cuz it ian't tuna and it has some severe laxative properties that has been cliamed to kill people in Japan..

so-called white tuna is very fatty an oily and sweet... however, it actually a mackeral called a snake mackeral or an escolar... it tastes wonderful and if you make it to the toilet after eating five large peices? you are lucky... Americans tend to eat sashimi in tiny bits as an appteizer or a small treat, in japan they will eat the whole meal- as much as pound of raw fish- or sashimi. not sushi. sushi can actaully be wthout any raw fish at all and still be sushi.. just rice and seaweed.. often called california rolls with some avacado?.... sushi can have sashimi init but it doesnot have to... sashim is the raw fish chunks...
i recomend sushim grade salmon and ahi and mahi mahi. myslef.. i don't care much for any shark or bottom fish... others love bottom fish but i don't...

never ever eat freshawter fish or mussels or crayfish raw... never! they can carry some parasites that will take years to discover and you won't even know how you got 'em and they will eat you up from the inside out...

i always laught at the 'organic" freaks trying tot tell me that chemicals are all bad.. parasites are pretty much out of our diets now from chemicals and peopel forget how they can really make you die a miserable death...

in japan? i got served up live one foot long shrimp still wriggling and the whole restaurant cheered when i actaully ate it and smiled (it was good) they all watched me sereptittiously for quite ahwile and then they began sending me food form their tables, the huge shrimp was gift form one family, and refused to allow me to pay anything at the end... i was stuffed.. this was in Kagashima in 82.. before sushi became a US thing... i had grown up eating raw oysters and i loved them when they are good.. the best thing i ate in japan? raw abalone in a white sauce... awesome.. that's another fishery that we have had to go to great lengths to protect from annihilation..

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IWISHIHAD
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Abalone, we use to get them along the rocks at newport and other areas.

Saw a show just two nights ago on them, super expensive now and have restrictions on them, hard to find anymore.

Funny my friends parents use to eat them but i never tried them.

Those Koi you were talking about, i went to look at a condo several weeks back and they had a pond with probably thirty of them, all big, i should have been fishing in that spot at those prices.

Aren't they just colored carp?


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glassman
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oh yeah, tiger shrimps? they are actually freshwater river prawn imported and raised in farms here. do not eat tiger shripm raw... you can eat the white srhimps raw if you want... i won;t eat 'em unless they are prepped by an expert cuz they know how to pick the safeest stuff...

fugu? i want try it sometime, but i doubt i will get the chance to... it is one thing i would like to try when i have about 60 yrs behind me...

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Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

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glassman
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quote:
Originally posted by IWISHIHAD:
Abalone, we use to get them along the rocks at newport and other areas.

Saw a show just two nights ago on them, super expensive now and have restrictions on them, hard to find anymore.

Funny my friends parents use to eat them but i never tried them.

Those Koi you were talking about, i went to look at a condo several weeks back and they had a pond with probably thirty of them, all big, i should have been fishing in that spot at those prices.

Aren't they just colored carp?


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yes and no, i have a koi photo that my wife and i worked together on that is an award winner..

Koi are something that you either get or don't get. They will eat from your hand like a dog. They are bred for their colors and come in most any color you like..... they breed prolifically but they do not breed true for th emost part. you can buy two award winners put htem togethr for a few years get hundred thousand junk fish form them and two more award winners... or a hnundred thousand award winner.. you never know fersure.

it's like breeding orchids or roses....

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Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

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raybond
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ok, glass what makes one koi worth $2500 and the same size healthy koi worth nothing.

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raybond
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I did a little research and to the best of what I can gather it is coloration that gives them value. And that is hard to control.

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glassman
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the color markings form the top make the koi special, not the sides like in tank, but form the top so whne you keep your water clear adn clean you can see them ...
the koi pond is supposed to be a complete art form, including the surrounding plants. It would be a great project for prisoners IMO....
they woul dhav eto learn alot about water quality and maintaining eqpt (pumps, filters, drains) it would create a peaceful atmosphere and keep them focused on very long term projects... they could dig it with shovels, that and the tarp liners are the biggest cost, you don't need to buy htem 2000 dollar breeders to start....

you can go inside small fenced areas in any big giant japanese city and be at peace with koi. they "hide these ponds everywhere and at all *scales*

my favorite ones look like this in this color, but have long wispy fins (butterfly)

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i had a pair of awesome ones like this but i only did 400 gallon pond (whihc jr and i dug by hand and had fun doing together) and they got to be 16 inches so i had to release them at the local duck pond which is not filtered) with all the others there....

the deal is that a baby butterfly like this would be 25 to 75 dollars, but at 16 inches it's 2 grand.... at 36 inches it can lay 100,000 eggs at whack but inly a couple will be great fish so you have to do aloto f culling. great looking babys can grow out of it nad become plain adualts, but rarely do plain looking babies become great looking adults.. raise a hundred get a couple reall good ones..

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raybond
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I had a neighbor that raised koi he had a regular fish pond. One day the cranes found them and that was the end of his koi.

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glassman
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cranes, and herons yes evil critters, i have bottle rockets always ready for them... however, a 16 incher won't be eaten by any but he very largest cranes.

you have to put clay pots in the water foe the koi to retreat to, and they will... they aren't really dumb just peaceful...

they will eat right out of your hand too...

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Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

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glassman
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here's a pic ofthe buttterfly koi
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they supposedly origninated from a variation here in the USA, but i suspect they may have been raies in other times and places too... genetic variations tend to recur.

the ones i prefer have two toned scales and metallic background...

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CashCowMoo
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I guess I save a lot of money by being happy with my catches. Fried catfish from a farm pond.

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It isn't so much that liberals are ignorant. It's just that they know so many things that aren't so.

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glassman
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i don't think Koi would taste good. i have never eaten carp, don't wanna... it is used in cetain foods, but the bones are everywhere..

small catfish from a clean pond or clean river are delicious... i especially like channel cat caught in spring when the water is cold and fast...

we used to sit out all night and catfish when i was a kid...

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raybond
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overview
The Butterfly Koi boasts long, flowing fins that add grace and peace to even the largest backyard oasis. It is appropriately named for its long, flowing fins often resembling butterfly wings. It is these longer, distinct fins that differentiate the Butterfly Koi from standard Koi. The Butterfly Koi is available in a variety of colors and patterns, but is most commonly available in white, yellow, orange, or a combination of these colors. While Butterfly Koi can live longer than 200 years, their typical life span is 25 to 35 years.
The ideal setup for Butterfly Koi is a 1,000+ gallon pond with a fine gravel substrate, rocks, and hardy plants. Because these Koi savor plant roots and will dig to get to them, be sure to place large rocks around the base of plants to protect them. You will also need to provide adequate filtration to maintain proper water conditions.

Males are easily recognized by their concave anal section and occasionally by breeding spots on the head. Spawning may result in as many as 1,000 eggs, with fry emerging in approximately 4 to 7 days, depending on the water temperature. Feed fry small live foods or frozen daphnia for the first 3 to 4 weeks. At that time, gradually change their diet to crushed flake and pellet foods. Their color will emerge in about 3 to 12 weeks.

Feed Domestic Butterfly Koi a quality pellet or flake food

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CashCowMoo
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Has anyone eaten gar?

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It isn't so much that liberals are ignorant. It's just that they know so many things that aren't so.

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glassman
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not to my knowledge, they have always been considered trash fish. 100 years ago ten footers were fairly common, and they might have pickled them if they were really desperate for food. we have them here in mS and every once in awhile i get a wild hair and try to shoot em with the bow in the back yard. i've only brought one (4 footer) all the way in cuz their scales are like armor. I've hit alot of em and the arrow don't stick. The one i got was swimming dead away from me and i guess the arrow got under a scale... eventhe cat wouldn't eat it.. soemthing did drag part of it off but it wasn't my dog or my cat... the skin is like a file.

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glassman
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quote:
Originally posted by raybond:
overview
The Butterfly Koi boasts long, flowing fins that add grace and peace to even the largest backyard oasis. It is appropriately named for its long, flowing fins often resembling butterfly wings. It is these longer, distinct fins that differentiate the Butterfly Koi from standard Koi. The Butterfly Koi is available in a variety of colors and patterns, but is most commonly available in white, yellow, orange, or a combination of these colors. While Butterfly Koi can live longer than 200 years, their typical life span is 25 to 35 years.
The ideal setup for Butterfly Koi is a 1,000+ gallon pond with a fine gravel substrate, rocks, and hardy plants. Because these Koi savor plant roots and will dig to get to them, be sure to place large rocks around the base of plants to protect them. You will also need to provide adequate filtration to maintain proper water conditions.

Males are easily recognized by their concave anal section and occasionally by breeding spots on the head. Spawning may result in as many as 1,000 eggs, with fry emerging in approximately 4 to 7 days, depending on the water temperature. Feed fry small live foods or frozen daphnia for the first 3 to 4 weeks. At that time, gradually change their diet to crushed flake and pellet foods. Their color will emerge in about 3 to 12 weeks.

Feed Domestic Butterfly Koi a quality pellet or flake food

that was my main mistake,i wnet with 400 gallon tank style pond liner instead of guying a good tarp and going to 1000 gallons... the tarps are cheaper and don't last as long, that was why i wnet with hard shell tank liner. They do eat the plants, but if you put water lillies in? they will grow well with 'em. The possibilities are endless and if you like mixing and pouring cement and concrete? you can make any kind of things you want.

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Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

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glassman
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you can conmbine a waterfall and decent homebuilt filtration sytem if you are handy with plywood,saw and concrete. the wood is just f rthe forms, add big roks tot eh wall first then pour concrete to lock it all together, pump your water up thru sand tothe top of the waterfall and let it run down into the pond , make sure you add a drain to back wash the filter away from the pond a few times a year...

prisoners would definitely get therapeutic activity out of it, i know i did and i ain't even prisoner

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Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

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glassman
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LOL, i just ran search for ht emost expnsive Koi ever, and the koiblog in Britain had soemone post the one i showed above. I had no idea which Koi iphoto i was grabbibg when i pulled it,

they said in the blog that it went for 2.2 million.. do not belive that, but i did find out that the orange and white one i posted above was the picture of Alexandria, the 2008 All Japan Grand Champion, owned by Andrew Fillipowski from the USA. so i bet $2500 would be about 1/5th to 1/10th the real price...

http://www.koimag.co.uk/forum/what-is-the-most-expensive-koi-ever-sold-t544556.h tml

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Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

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glassman
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this one here would definitley get my attention:

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Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

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raybond
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a koi auction


http://www.koiforauction.biz/#804104b35b77

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CashCowMoo
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quote:
Originally posted by glassman:
you can conmbine a waterfall and decent homebuilt filtration sytem if you are handy with plywood,saw and concrete. the wood is just f rthe forms, add big roks tot eh wall first then pour concrete to lock it all together, pump your water up thru sand tothe top of the waterfall and let it run down into the pond , make sure you add a drain to back wash the filter away from the pond a few times a year...

prisoners would definitely get therapeutic activity out of it, i know i did and i ain't even prisoner

Do you think if they had Koi farms in prisons where they raised and cared for them that the rate of prison violence would go down? Was watching a show earlier and it was talking about how prisons are so overpopulated it is impossible to give one on one attention to any problems. Prisons are just temp housing units and they send them back out into the population.

I am all about paying your dues, but we can do better than what we have. I do NOT want to go the way of places like Sweden where you can murder a ton of people on an island and then only get 15 years.

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It isn't so much that liberals are ignorant. It's just that they know so many things that aren't so.

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T e x
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re: Alligator gar

My brother-in-law's father found a way to make gar palatable; the problem is, cooked in usual fashion(s), the meat swells up in your belly. What he did was run it through a blender and make balls with a little flour coating, then deep-fried, kinda like a hushpuppy.

Too much work for me--it's a damn project just to clean 'em.

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Nashoba Holba Chepulechi
Adventures in microcapitalism...

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IWISHIHAD
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Originally Posted By CashCowMoo:

"I guess I save a lot of money by being happy with my catches. Fried catfish from a farm pond."
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Koi are just pretty carp.

Carp come in many varieties, the Koi are carp breed for there colors and considered more domesticated, whatever that means for a fish.

They are eaten all over the world, they grow very large and fast and eat most anything and can live in pretty bad water, they are very boney as was mentioned already.

If you every get on the Colorado River in some of the slow ares where there are deeper ponds, you can see hugh schools of them and there are some monsters, at least there use to be.

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glassman
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this snake is for sale right now for "only" 6500$ and there are some even more expensive at the same shop: ben seigel reptiles of Fla.

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glassman
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15,000$ males, 10,000$ females:

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before you laugh at these prices? you have to realise that they can have 35 babies in one year and you can get your 5X profits in two to three. keep inmind that you have to know what you are doing to get them to breed, and that in five years they'll just be 200$ again. the real money is in designing the breeding systems to develop the color morphs.

when i was doing parrots, everybody kept telling me to do ostriches and i refused. too much capital in the pens and fences i had the land, but was not interested in putting out $200,000 startup costs for an animla that was really only wothr 1500 at he butchers. even if they do lay 25 eggs per year os so.... sure enought he market on them dropped like rock form 40,000$ per breeding pair to 3,000 per pair in amatter of a decade....

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Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

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glassman
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quote:
Originally posted by T e x:
re: Alligator gar

My brother-in-law's father found a way to make gar palatable; the problem is, cooked in usual fashion(s), the meat swells up in your belly. What he did was run it through a blender and make balls with a little flour coating, then deep-fried, kinda like a hushpuppy.

Too much work for me--it's a damn project just to clean 'em.

yep, that sounds just like gefilte fish but fried instead of poached...

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Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

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