Allstocks.com's Bulletin Board Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Allstocks.com's Bulletin Board » Off-Topic Post, Non Stock Talk » Another day, another Donald Trump doozie. (Page 4)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 5 pages: 1  2  3  4  5   
Author Topic: Another day, another Donald Trump doozie.
Relentless.
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Relentless.     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Trump is getting better and better. What a perfect reply for Jeb running out of money.
Posts: 2963 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Relentless.
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Relentless.     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It seems the idiot establishment is choosing Rubio.

Understandable. Rubio (what I've seen of him) seems to be a forceful speaker. He has "presence ".

He is also a bought and paid for shill/soldier of the establishment... as are all the others... Except maybe Trump?

In the coming months watch as Carson is sidelined and Rubio advances...

Remember my prediction that the next Prez will be seen as a strong foreign policy/strong leader type much like the Clinton/Bush transition..

Posts: 2963 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson passed real-estate tycoon Donald Trump in a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll published Monday evening.

In the survey of Republican presidential primary voters, Carson grabbed 29% while Trump got 23%.

The results followed last week's CBS News/New York Times poll that found Carson ahead, which broke Trump's months-long winning streak in national surveys.

The Times reported that Carson's position in the NBC/WSJ poll on Monday "is the highest any Republican candidate has reached in that survey."

However, pollster Fred Yang, whose firm conducted the poll, struck a cautious note. Yang said that Carson "has broad support, but we don't know yet the depth and commitment of that support."

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida) got third place in the poll, with 11%, followed by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), with 10%, and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R), with 8%. No other candidate had more than 3%.

For his part, Carson celebrated the results on Facebook.

"We the People continue to surge!" Carson wrote next to an image blaring: "BEN'S ON TOP!"

--------------------
Wise men learn more from fools than fools from the wise.

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Donald Trump has fired off one of his most furious tweetstorms to date.

The real-estate magnate's target on Thursday night: Gov. John Kasich of Ohio, a Republican presidential rival.

Politico reported earlier in the evening that a pro-Kasich super PAC was planning to unload $2.5 million or more to take down Trump, the Republican front-runner, in New Hampshire.

This prompted a dozen-tweet barrage by Trump against Kasich, ripping the PAC's attack as "pathetic" and calling the governor a "dud" over the report, among many other things.

"I want to do negative ads on John Kasich, but he is so irrelevant to the race that I don’t want to waste my money," Trump said.

"Watch Kasich squirm --- if he is not truthful in his negative ads I will sue him just for fun!" he continued.

The billionaire apparently took his threat beyond Twitter. The super PAC, New Day for America, published a letter from The Trump Organization's lawyer warning that Trump would promptly seek "legal action" against the committee if its ads lied about Trump.

"It has come to my attention that you plan on producing and disseminating certain radio, television, and newspaper advertisements directly and personally attacking my client," Trump's lawyer, Alan Garten, wrote in the letter, which was also addressed to the Kasich campaign.

"Please be advised that in the event your ads contain any false, misleading, defamatory or otherwise tortious statements or representations concerning Mr. Trump's business or his brand, we will not hesitate to seek immediate legal action," it continued.

The letter concluded: "Please be guided accordingly."

The letter was similar in nature to a September cease-in-desist letter The Trump Organization sent to a conservative group, the Club for Growth, that ran attack ads against Trump in Iowa. Some eyebrows were raised because the letter was sent from Trump's corporation rather than from his campaign.

Matt David, New Day for America's chief strategist, responded to Trump's letter in a statement late Thursday.

"Mr. Trump's been successful in suing his way to financial gain," David said. "Unfortunately, you can't sue your way to the Oval Office."

"Trump can hire every trial lawyer in the country, but voters will ultimately decide this election," he continued. "You can't sue ISIS away. Suing Vladimir Putin won't evict Russia from the Ukraine. The role of commander-in-chief requires leadership, not lawyers."

Business Insider reached out to The Trump Organization for comment.

For his part, Kasich went on his own rival tweetstorm and issued a fund-raising message to supporters on Trump's "epic Twitter rant."

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Relentless.
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Relentless.     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Funny because the last 4 elections have been decided by Diebold, not voters.

Can't wait.

Posts: 2963 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Real-estate magnate Donald Trump is the "undisputed leader" of the Republican presidential field, and his lead has grown over the past month while retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson has plummeted.

Trump is the first choice of 27% of Republican primary voters nationally, according to a new survey from Quinnipiac University out Wednesday. It's his best showing in the poll since August and a 3-point increase from last month.

Carson, who was 1 point behind Trump last month, has seen his standing plunge to 16%. That puts him in a tie for third place with Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas.

Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, who along with Cruz has surged recently, found himself in second place in the poll with 17% support. Former Gov. Jeb Bush of Florida rounds out the top five, garnering 5% in the survey.

"It doesn't seem to matter what he says or who he offends, whether the facts are contested or the 'political correctness' is challenged, Donald Trump seems to be wearing Kevlar," said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University poll.

"Dr. Ben Carson, moving to center stage just one month ago, now needs some CPR. The Doctor sinks. The Donald soars. The GOP, 11 months from the election, has to be thinking, 'This could be the guy.'"

Indeed, Republican leaders seem to be increasingly bracing for the possibility that Trump could be the party's standard bearer next year. The New York Times reported Tuesday that the party was starting to become concerned that Trump as the nominee would negatively affect the GOP's down-ballot candidates.

"It would be an utter, complete and total disaster," Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, a presidential rival who has repeatedly tangled with Trump, told The Times. "If you're a xenophobic, race-baiting, religious bigot, you're going to have a hard time being president of the United States, and you're going to do irreparable damage to the party."

Carson, meanwhile, has seen his standing tumble as he has faced a slew of negative publicity in recent weeks. Most recently, questions about his foreign-policy knowledge placed him under days of scrutiny.

The poll found, however, that the race is still highly volatile two months away from the Iowa caucuses. Just 32% of Republican primary voters said their minds were "made up" about their voting choice, while 65% said they could change their mind.

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Over a third of registered Republican and Republican-leaning voters would vote for Donald Trump -- a wide margin over the rest of the GOP field, according to a new poll released Friday.



The CNN/ORC survey shows Trump's campaign muscle: He has 36 percent of support among poll respondents, 20 points ahead of his nearest competitor. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, in second place, trails Trump with 16 percent of those surveyed favoring him. Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson comes in at 14 percent, and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio at 12 percent. No other candidate breaks a 5 percent threshold.

Since the last CNN/ORC poll in October, some candidates have seen a steep decline in national support. Carson lost 8 points from the previous survey, when he had registered in second place. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush is down 5 points to 3 percent, and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul is down 4 points to 1 percent of support.

The real estate mogul also dominates when it comes to issues voters identify as most important to them. Survey respondents said Trump was best qualified to handle the economy at an overwhelming 55 percent (Cruz is next with 9 percent), along with illegal immigration, ISIS threats, foreign policy, and the federal budget.

A majority of Republican voters (52 percent) also point to Trump as the GOP hopeful with the best chances to win November's general election. Fifteen percent believe that of Rubio, 11 percent for Cruz, and 10 percent for Carson.

The poll was taken before Wednesday's San Bernardino shooting, from November 27 - December 1, 2015. The margin of error is 3 percentage points.
.
© 2015 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Happy Valley
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Happy Valley     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Trump/Cruz will be the GOP ticket...JMO
Posts: 2376 | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CashCowMoo
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for CashCowMoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Happy Valley:
Trump/Cruz will be the GOP ticket...JMO

Id definitely take that over Hillary Clinton. After 8 years of crap load after crap load...Trump and Cruz would get some things done. Im not on the trump train by any means, because I worry about what he would do for executive actions. He gave a good interview on Alex Jones. Worth the watch if you have time. Cruz is extremely intelligent. A much better student of law than what we have.


The country is a mess right now.

--------------------
It isn't so much that liberals are ignorant. It's just that they know so many things that aren't so.

Posts: 6946 | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Happy Valley
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Happy Valley     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by CashCowMoo:
quote:
Originally posted by Happy Valley:
Trump/Cruz will be the GOP ticket...JMO

Id definitely take that over Hillary Clinton. After 8 years of crap load after crap load...Trump and Cruz would get some things done. Im not on the trump train by any means, because I worry about what he would do for executive actions. He gave a good interview on Alex Jones. Worth the watch if you have time. Cruz is extremely intelligent. A much better student of law than what we have.


The country is a mess right now.

I agree and like yourself, I'm not a Trump fan boy by any means. I share some of your concerns regarding executive actions but I think he is smart enough to surround himself with people that will compensate for whatever shortcomings he may or may not have. I think you can say that about every candidate, on both sides. They all have areas they excel at and areas they may not be as polished. Trump didn't get to where he is by himself, successful people generally understand the necessity of surrounding themselves with people that are equally as successful in their area of expertise.

As for Cruz, I've always liked him. Very intelligent and extremely quick on his feet. Rarely does anybody take shots at Cruz on the debate stage, I don't think they they want to get in a battle of wits with him. More importantly, he defends the Constitution and the 2A in particular. Love watching him destroy liberal fools like Dianne Feinsten and talking head media members over the true meaning of the 2A.

Posts: 2376 | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CashCowMoo
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for CashCowMoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The country definitely needs repaired. All this gun phobia is out of control...actually its called hoplophobia, the fear of guns. Notice Obama doesnt ever talk about really solving the problems when it comes to violence. The riots, the protests, all the black lives matter bull**** going on. Marching and beating drums chanting they want dead cops in cities across the country. A slimy attorney general, most likely worse than Eric Holder. They got the New York Times running articles about turning in guns for the greater good.

You get people like ray or jordan who foam at the mouth for these kinds of Democrats to be in power over them. No transparency, no following the law, no over-watch. Things need to change, and I am LOVING the fact that establishment Republicans are freaking out over Trump. Im so sick of them too. You know, the Karl Rove types.

And back to Cruz, he is the REAL Harvard law. Not some slick snake oil salesman like Obama is. Id love to see Cruz debate Hillary Clinton.

--------------------
It isn't so much that liberals are ignorant. It's just that they know so many things that aren't so.

Posts: 6946 | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
IWISHIHAD
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for IWISHIHAD     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The one thing that we can be sure of is that a lot of Americans are tired of what has been going on for quite some time.

It appears neither major party can change our minds and have made some major mistakes in underestimating the American public.

Of course we will see if they can figure a way to sidestep major issues before election time, which so far has not happened.

To bad we need such an extreme way to try and wake up our elected, so called representatives.

-

Posts: 3875 | From: ca. | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
You get people like ray or jordan who foam at the mouth for these kinds of Democrats to be in power over them. No transparency, no following the law, no over-watch. Things need to change, and I am LOVING the fact that establishment Republicans are freaking out over Trump. Im so sick of them too. You know, the Karl Rove types.

posted by cash

-------------------------------------------------

again a total fabrication on your part

--------------------
Wise men learn more from fools than fools from the wise.

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Relentless.
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Relentless.     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by raybond:
You get people like ray or jordan who foam at the mouth for these kinds of Democrats to be in power over them. No transparency, no following the law, no over-watch. Things need to change, and I am LOVING the fact that establishment Republicans are freaking out over Trump. Im so sick of them too. You know, the Karl Rove types.

posted by cash

-------------------------------------------------

again a total fabrication on your part

Really?

Then where is the foam coming from... Nevermind. I don't want to know.

Posts: 2963 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Real-estate mogul Donald Trump has opened up his lead among Republican primary voters to nearly 20 points, according to a New York Times/CBS poll out Thursday.
Trump garnered the support of 35% of Republican voters nationally, a 13-point increase from the previous New York Times/CBS survey. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, at 16%, and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, at 13%, were his closest competitors. Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida was in fourth place, at 9%.

The Times noted that it was Trump’s “strongest position yet” in the survey.

The poll was mostly conducted before Trump’s statement on Monday pledging to temporarily bar Muslims from entering the US. Those comments have caused a firestorm both within and outside the Republican Party.

Other polls, however, have already signaled that Trump may benefit from his proposal. A Bloomberg Politics survey released Wednesday found that nearly two-thirds of Republican primary voters backed his plan. And a Fox News poll of South Carolina Republicans found Trump gaining support in the days after announcing the proposal.

In the previous Times/CBS survey, taken in late October, Trump trailed Carson 26% to 22%. Cruz has nearly tripled his support from October, while Rubio’s support remained flat.

All other Republican candidates in Thursday’s poll received 4% or less support. On the Democratic side, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had a 20-point lead over her closest rival, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont).

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Relentless.
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Relentless.     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Honey Badger
Posts: 2963 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I said on this board that the delegates might not let Trump to be nominated. Now there is talk of that.


Republican leaders don’t want to make America great again.

Leading Republicans, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus met Monday to discuss how the party could “lay the groundwork for a floor fight in which the GOP’s mainstream wing could coalesce around an alternative,” according to the Washington Post’s Robert Costa and Tom Hamburger. With many candidates still in the race, and Trump commanding a strong plurality — but nowhere near a majority — in the polls, it’s easy to imagine a scenario where Trump wins more primary votes than any other candidate but still lacks enough delegates to lock up the nomination. Indeed, the delegate math seems to favor the establishment.

The Party’s Rules

The GOP uses an arcane and multi-faceted method to allocate delegates to each state. Each state receives 10 at-large delegates, plus three delegates for each of the state’s congressional districts. A set number of delegates are also allocated to regions like the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. And three party leaders from each jurisdiction are also designated as delegates.

The party’s rules then award a significant number of bonus delegates to states that supported the Republican Party’s nominee in the previous presidential election, as well as smaller bonuses to states with Republican governors, senators, House delegations and state legislative majorities. As a result, deep red states can rack up bonuses that give them delegate counts out of proportion to their population. The red state of Mississippi, a state with less than 3 million people, will send 40 delegates to the Republican National Convention. Meanwhile, the swing state of Colorado, which has nearly 5.4 million people, will only send 37 delegates to the party’s convention.

In total, 2,472 delegates will meet in Cleveland to select the party’s nominee. That means that a candidate needs 1,237 delegates (50 percent +1) in order to capture the nomination.

Trump’s biggest asset is winner-take-all states. So long as he captures a plurality of the vote in these states, he wins every delegate that is up for grabs in the state. Although the GOP’s rules require states that wish to hold a winner-take-all contest to schedule their primary or caucus no sooner than March 15, eleven states and territories will have such a contest. Additionally, a handful of states allocate some portion of their delegates to the winner of the state as a whole. In total, Trump could win about 500 delegates in states that award a bloc of delegates to the candidate who wins a plurality of the vote.

Even if Trump captures every single one of these delegates, however, he would still need to capture over 700 of the nearly 2,000 remaining delegates in order to emerge as the nominee, and here is where the math gets much more difficult for him. Even if he captures every single delegate awarded to candidates who win a plurality of the votes in a state, he would still need to win approximately 37 percent of the remaining delegates to capture the nomination — under the various and often complex rules that each state uses to allocate these delegates. Currently, the Real Clear Politics polling average shows Trump leading the GOP field with about 30 percent of the vote, so his current polls likely do not give him enough support to capture the nomination outright.

Additionally, it’s worth noting that not every delegate is “bound” to support the candidate they pledged to support prior to the convention, and the three party leaders from each state are especially likely to have the freedom to back a candidate of their own choosing. These leaders may be the most likely delegates to support an establishment coup seeking to dislodge Trump.

Wild Cards

So the math for Trump is rough, although there are a few wild cards that work in his favor. The first is that, although the GOP gives bonus delegates to states with a record of supporting Republicans, other features of the party’s nominating process give an unexpected advantage to Republicans who live in blue areas of the country.

As David Wasserman explains at Five Thirty Eight, the fact that each congressional district receives three delegates regardless of how red or blue the district may be gives a boost to Republican primary voters living in blue states that select delegates at the district level. “Three delegates are up for grabs in New York’s heavily Latino, Bronx-based 15th District,” Wasserman explains, “which cast just 5,315 votes for Romney in 2012.” Meanwhile, “there are also three delegates at stake in Alabama’s 6th District, which covers Birmingham’s whitest suburbs and gave Romney 233,803 votes.” As a result, “a GOP primary vote cast in the bluest part of the Bronx could be worth 43 times more than a vote cast in the reddest part of Alabama.”

Wasserman argues that this phenomenon puts Trump at a disadvantage, because it inflates the importance of votes cast by primary voters in more moderate regions of the country. But even if it is true that a Republican in the Bronx is more likely to hold moderate views than a Republican in Alabama, it’s not at all clear that this factor cuts against Trump. To the contrary, multiple polls have shown Trump polling strongest among self-identified moderate and liberal Republicans. A recent Quinnipiac poll, for example, showed Trump earning only 25 percent of “very conservative” Republicans, a showing that placed him four points behind conservative stalwart Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) among these unusually conservative voters. The same poll showed Trump earning 31 percent of “moderate” or “liberal” Republicans. So if the GOP delegate selection process gives extra say to self-described moderates, that appears to place Trump at an advantage.

And then there’s the biggest wildcard of all — rebellion. On Friday morning, Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson offered a sharp response to Republican leaders who hope to deny Trump the nomination at the convention. “If this was the beginning of a plan to subvert the will of the voters and replace it with the will of the political elite,” Carson said in a statement, “I assure you that Donald Trump will not be the only one leaving the party.” Meanwhile, Trump himself recently tweeted a message that’s hard to read as anything other than a threat to undercut the GOP presidential candidate in 2016 in the exact same way that Ralph Nader helped put George W. Bush in the White House in 2000:

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Brokered convention


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Jump to: navigation, search


In United States politics, a brokered convention is a situation in which no single candidate has secured a pre-existing majority of delegates (whether those selected by primary elections and caucuses, or superdelegates) prior to the first official vote for a political party's presidential candidate at its nominating convention.

Once the first ballot, or vote, has occurred, and no candidate has a majority of the delegates' votes, the convention is then considered brokered; thereafter, the nomination is decided through a process of alternating political horse-trading, and additional re-votes.[1][2][3][4] In this circumstance, all regular delegates (who, previously, may have been pledged to a particular candidate according to rules which vary from state to state) are "released," and are able to switch their allegiance to a different candidate before the next round of balloting. It is hoped that this 'freedom' will result in a re-vote resulting in a clear majority of delegates for one candidate.

Superdelegate votes are counted on the first ballot. Although the term "brokered convention" is sometimes used to refer to a convention where the outcome is decided by superdelegate votes rather than pledged delegates alone, this is not the original sense of the term. Like a brokered convention, the potentially decisive role played by superdelegates can often go against the popular vote from the primaries and caucuses


still looking for fair play anybody

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
glassman
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for glassman     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
the delegates might not let Trump to be nominated. Now there is talk of that.

that's how China does it.

i have only one response to the idea of a brokered convention by either party. esp. if the cnadidates are BOTH internally picked by the party (the Clinton's have already decided who the Democrats will pick). It doesn't seem to matter much to most people anymore that we are becoming mor elike China than they are becoming more like US.

last one out be sure to turn off the lights (if they are still working that is)

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.--That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.--Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government.


--------------------
Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

Posts: 36378 | From: USA | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
buckstalker
Member


Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted      Profile for buckstalker     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Relentless.:
Honey Badger

That video is hilarious...thanks for the laugh RD
Posts: 4303 | From: DSA | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Peaser
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Peaser     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
https://www.facebook.com/tedcruzpage/videos/10153764899572464/?theater

--------------------
Buy Low. Sell High.

Posts: 10736 | From: The Land Of The Giants | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Politics

Donald Trump just jumped to his highest point yet in a new poll
Colin Campbell,Business Insider 2 hours 22 minutes ago .


donald trump
(AP Photo/Michael Snyder)
Donald Trump.
Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump's campaign isn't slowing down, at least when it comes to national polling.

In a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll published Thursday, Trump reached his highest number yet in that survey.

The poll found that Trump was the top choice of 33% of Republican primary voters.

That gave him a 13-point lead over the No. 2. Republican, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), who had 20% support.

NBC News reported that Trump's margin over Cruz sharply increased since last month, when the same poll found five points separating the two candidates.

In the survey released Thursday, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida) was the first choice of 13% of primary voters, followed by retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson's 12%. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R) and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) both had 5%, while no other candidate had more than 3%.

Although Trump is dominant in national polls, the first state to weigh in on the primary, Iowa, is not as friendly turf for the real-estate mogul. Cruz has placed first in a number of recent surveys of likely Iowa caucus-goers, who cast their votes on February 1.

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Peaser
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Peaser     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
This is what lost the Trump the Christian vote:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8EIgHsGZAmk

--------------------
Buy Low. Sell High.

Posts: 10736 | From: The Land Of The Giants | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CashCowMoo
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for CashCowMoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Peaser:
This is what lost the Trump the Christian vote:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8EIgHsGZAmk

Oh that was so hard to watch. Very hard. Two Corinthians? Then the Sarah Palin endorsement speech...again hard to watch.
Posts: 6946 | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Peaser
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Peaser     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hahahaha. Did she sabotage that, or what?

--------------------
Buy Low. Sell High.

Posts: 10736 | From: The Land Of The Giants | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Sarah Plain what a ditz, I listen to that idiot and I am glad that she is a republican. She belongs in a laundromat holding a republican rally.

--------------------
Wise men learn more from fools than fools from the wise.

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Peaser
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Peaser     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by raybond:
Sarah Plain what a ditz, I listen to that idiot and I am glad that she is a republican. She belongs in a laundromat holding a republican rally.

I wasn't sure if it was Sarah or Howard Dean? lol What a joke.

--------------------
Buy Low. Sell High.

Posts: 10736 | From: The Land Of The Giants | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Relentless.
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Relentless.     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The screeching voice is enough to melt asphalt.
Posts: 2963 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
MOINES (Reuters) - Republican front-runner candidate Donald Trump has a big lead in the race for the 2016 presidential nomination nationally, swamping his opponents with a 40.6 percent share of those surveyed, a Reuters-Ipsos tracking poll found on Friday.

The survey of 582 respondents found Trump with a higher percentage of the vote than his next four challengers combined, with Texas Senator Ted Cruz drawing 10.5 percent, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson with 9.7 percent, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush at 9.2 percent and Florida Senator Marco Rubio with 7.2 percent.

In a hypothetical matchup between Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton and Trump, Clinton holds a statistically insignificant lead of 41.4 percent to 40.8 percent.

Trump has been leading national polls of Republican voters for months. He also holds a lead in some polls in the early voting states of Iowa and New Hampshire with the Iowa caucuses just days away on Feb. 1.

A separate Reuters-Ipsos poll on Friday found the U.S. economy re-emerging as a major concern for voters. Economic concerns had taken a back seat to fears of terrorism after last year's Islamic State attacks in Paris.

The survey of 1,614 respondents found terrorism a top concern at 20.3 percent, but the U.S. economy close behind at 18.2 percent.

--------------------
Wise men learn more from fools than fools from the wise.

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CashCowMoo
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for CashCowMoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Peaser:
Hahahaha. Did she sabotage that, or what?

I watched most of the speech. Saw Trump with the fakest grin I have seen on him I think. He wouldnt have that doing a presentation in his boardroom. Why would he for President? He must really want to get the evangelical vote, and as much away from cruz as he can. There is a split among conservatives right now. Beck, Palin, Levin, Limbaugh, National Review and everyone behind that article. Its all boiling down to Cruz and Trump. Everyone else is done, and after Iowa I would HOPE some finally get out.

Who in their right mind would donate 6 or 7 figures to the Jeb Bush campaign? Carson too.

Posts: 6946 | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Peaser
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Peaser     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I agree. No matter who is elected, Ben Carson has Surgeon General locked up, and Trey Gowdy has AG locked up.
I want Cruz to win, main reason is that about 4 Supreme Court Justice seats are coming up for this next president. It worries me to think what that would mean if Trump were elected to office.

--------------------
Buy Low. Sell High.

Posts: 10736 | From: The Land Of The Giants | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
WASHINGTON – Donald Trump is thumping Ted Cruz by double digits in a new Iowa poll, while Bernie Sanders has grabbed a significant lead from Hillary Clinton among Democrats likely to caucus in the state.

Trump, who has been neck-and-neck with Cruz in recent Iowa GOP surveys, now leads the Texas senator 37 percent to 26 percent, with Florida Sen. Marco Rubio at with 14 percent, according to a CNN/ORC poll released Thursday.

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Cruz has been very critical of New York morality, meaning the south is the moral bastion of the country. Here is a brief of what like would be like if the south had a firm dominant position over the country.


The association of North with modernity and South with regression is so prominent, so visible, so all-encompassing that its familiarity has made it invisible. Here are the facts—with important exceptions in every category. The great research universities are in the blue states. So are the great medical schools, the great hospitals, and the great law schools. The great art and history museums are in the blue part of the country.


The most important popular and “high” art is produced by blue people, in blue places. Even the best comedians—with the exception of Stephen Colbert—are, you might say, from free as opposed to slave states.


By contrast, the South leads in all the negative trends. The South has the highest infant mortality rate. It has the most traffic deaths. It leads the country in gun deaths. It has the greatest number of obese people. It has the highest rate of diabetes. It has the largest number of people dying from stroke—a broad swath of the southeastern United States is known as the “stroke belt.” The South has the highest rates of cognitive decline.


Interestingly, though the South is home to the major tobacco companies and to carcinogenic Coca-Cola, the highest incidence of many types of cancer happens to be in the North. Which just proves that the stress of living alongside the Confederacy is now seriously affecting our health.


And the country’s great, recent Southern presidents? Jimmy Carter did more damage to the liberal agenda, which had been heroically advanced by that arch-fiend Richard Nixon, than any other modern president. In 1993, Arkansan Bill Clinton proposed a budget nearly devoid of social investment and almost identical to Reagan’s years earlier. Even when they find themselves in the vanguard of mainstream American politics, Southern politicians heed their atavistic instincts—and their gift for nimble expedience—and turn, like flowers straining toward the setting sun, back to the 19th century.


As for the great numbers of enlightened men and women in the South, let me cut through all the nuances of history and polemic and invite them all to flee northward. To paraphrase Swift, I am opposed to the Southern tribe as a voting, obstructing, retarding whole, but not to the countless individuals who make up the tribe, some of whom of course are exemplars of decency, humanity, wit, sophistication, and charm. Let them come north, and enrich us with their grace and charm. (And maybe if CNN moved their headquarters to New York or Philadelphia or Boston, the network could save its plummeting ratings simply by changing its employees’ diets.)

Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
glassman
Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for glassman     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I live in that South ray. It's all true as far as i can tell. Fleeing is not a solution though. I've lived in alot of places now,they all have unusual problems. I urge people to come down to the south. Sell your 500,000 house and buy one even better for 250,000 here, and help fix this mess.
I feel kinda like a sailor who's boat sprang a leak, but i have to bail with a teacup when a five gallon bucket is required...

--------------------
Don't envy the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise.

Posts: 36378 | From: USA | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
raybond
Member


Rate Member
Icon 1 posted      Profile for raybond     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
No insult intended glass . I have worked with people from the south and have had neighbors from the south and they were very good people. As for my own opinion we should spend the money and up lift the deep south to the same standards as the rest of the country it would take a few generations to see the results but it would be worth it.
Posts: 3767 | From: beautiful California | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 5 pages: 1  2  3  4  5   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Allstocks.com Message Board Home

© 1997 - 2013 Allstocks.com. All rights reserved.

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2

Share